Check Engine

MASERATI

Check Engine is here to help you find your way among the dozens of sports models that the Italian manufacturer Maserati offers or has offered since 1914.
We also invite you to discover a page in the history of Maserati, as well as its Italian factories in Modena.

maserati_3500_GT_touring

3500 GT Touring

1957 / 1964

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM101

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.5 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

220 ch
6.9 s
230 km/h
The basic concept for the car, drawn up by owner Adolfo Orsi and designer Giulio Alfieri, was that of a fast GT that would be interesting to drive but also comfortable and practical for everyday use. Many famous customers adopted the 3500 GT, including Prince Rainier III of Monaco, tenor Giuseppe di Stefano, actors Alberto Sordi, Tony Curtis, Stewart Granger, Rock Hudson and Anthony Quinn. Franco Cornacchia – an amateur racing driver who became Maserati’s representative in Milan – regularly drove the 3500 GTs between Milan and Modena on the Autostrada del Sole, setting a toll record of 39 minutes over some 160 km. From 1961, Lucas fuel injection became available as an option on the Maserati 3500 GT, under the name 3500 GTi, which then gained 15 bhp.

CONSUMPTION

14.0 L/100kms

LENGTH

4780 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1760 cm

RESERVOIR

75 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

500 L

WEIGHT

1440 kg
maserati_3500_GT_Spyder

3500 GT Spyder

1959 / 1964

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM101

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

V6
3.5 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

220 ch
6.9 s
230 km/h
Spyder became the official name for foreign markets from 1961. Master coachbuilder Alfredo Vignale of Turin won the contract to produce the convertible version of Maserati’s first mass-produced GT car. The car’s lines – designed by Giovanni Michelotti – differed from those of the Touring coupé with a slightly more angular and muscular line. Touring also offered a shortened version of its coupé, of which only three were finalised, while Vignale assembled several pre-production prototypes showing differences in detail before the final production design was established. In six years, some 243 Spyders were sold. From 1961, Lucas fuel injection became available as an option on the Maserati 3500 GT, under the name 3500 GTi, which then gained 15 bhp.

CONSUMPTION

14.0 L/100kms

LENGTH

4450 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1635 cm

RESERVOIR

75 L

HEIGHT

1310 cm

BOOT VOLUME

300 L

WEIGHT

1482 kg
maserati_5000_GT_touring

5000 GT Touring

1959 / 1965

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM103

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

V8
4.9 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

325 ch
6.5 s
260 km/h
The birth of the 5000 GT Touring was the result of cooperation between the engineer Giulio Alfieri and the Shah of Iran Reza Pahlavi. The Shah entrusted Maserati with the task of producing an exceptional car. As such, the 5000 GT was a very high-end ‘made-to-measure’ version of the 3500 GT, powered by a V8 engine that would benefit from improvements in 1960, including an increase in cubic capacity to 340 bhp.

CONSUMPTION

22.0 L/100kms

LENGTH

4760 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1700 cm

RESERVOIR

100 L

HEIGHT

1320 cm

BOOT VOLUME

/ L

WEIGHT

1652 kg
maserati_3500_GTI

Sebring 3500 GTI

1962 / 1968

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM101

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.5 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

235 ch
6.9 s
235 km/h
In the 1960s, Maserati set out to compete with British prestige car manufacturer Aston Martin. The 3500 GT, despite its undeniable commercial success, failed to outstrip the Aston Martin DBs, particularly the DB4. In 1961, Vignale presented a spendid variation of the 3500 GT coupé, the 2+2 coupé entering production the following year alongside the ordinary 3500 GT with a number of minor cosmetic changes. The chassis was similar to that of the 3500 GT spyder (2.5 metres long). Lucas direct petrol injection was fitted as standard. Sportier than the 3500 GT, the Sebring was designed as an occasional 2-plus-2-seater with a single rear bench seat. The engine was rated at 235bhp, generating speeds in excess of 235kph. Disc brakes came as standard, while an automatic gearbox was optional.

CONSUMPTION

11.5 L/100kms

LENGTH

4470 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1665 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

350 L

WEIGHT

1520 kg
maserati_quattroporte_I

Quattroporte I

1963 / 1966

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Passenger car
AM107

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

V8
4.2 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

260 ch
8.0 s
230 km/h
The fastest four-door saloon of the 1960s: its top speed ranged from 210 to 230 km/h, depending on engine, gearbox and driving style. Designer Pietro Frua drew inspiration from the 5000 GT made for the Aga Khan two years earlier. The body was produced by Officine Vignale (772 in total). The car had a newly designed chassis, with a front subframe. Initially, the car was fitted with rear suspension similar to the DeDion, but from 1966 this was replaced by a rigid axle. The engine was a newly designed V8, with a capacity of 4.2 litres and a power output of 260 bhp (from 1966 the car became available with a 4.7-litre engine and a power output of 290 bhp), fed by four naturally aspirated carburettors; ignition was simple, the gearbox was 5-speed manual, or 3-speed automatic.

CONSUMPTION

LENGTH

5000 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1720 cm

RESERVOIR

80 L

HEIGHT

1360 cm

BOOT VOLUME

700 L

WEIGHT

1700 kg
maserati_mistral_3_7

Mistral 3.7

1963 / 1970

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM109

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.7 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

245 ch
6.4 s
255 km/h
The Maserati Mistral was originally launched as a 2-seater coupé in November 1963 at the Turin Motor Show, alongside the very first Quattroporte. Simply christened “2 Posti” (or even “Berlina 2 Posti” as Road & Track still called it in 1964), it took the name Mistral at the suggestion of Maserati’s French importer, Colonel John Simone. Mistral is the name of a French wind blowing along the Mediterranean coast, and from then on Maserati 2-seater sports cars took on wind names. The 2+2 coupés kept circuit names, as had begun a year earlier with the Sebring.

CONSUMPTION

11.8 L/100kms

LENGTH

4500 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1675 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

WEIGHT

1430 kg
maserati_mistral_spyder_3_5

Mistral Spyder 3.5

1964 / 1970

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM109

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.5 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

235 ch
6.6 s
245 km/h
The extremely elegant lines of the Mistral have been further enhanced in the cabriolet version. As with the coupé, its design was the work of Giovanni Michelotti, and Vignale was the coachbuilder. It was offered with a choice of either the 3.5-litre engine from the 3500 GT or the 3.7-litre from the same car, to which a 4-litre version was added a few years later. As with the coupé, during its first year of production the car was still known simply as the ‘2 Posti’ spyder, before the more poetic name of Mistral was adopted. Even with the 3.5-litre engine, performance was much more than poetic, with 235bhp available under the bonnet. The bodywork of the Mistral convertibles was predominantly steel, with the bonnet, doors and boot lid in alloy. A very rare optional hardtop was designed for the car and also made from light alloy.

CONSUMPTION

11.5 L/100kms

LENGTH

4500 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1670 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

/ L

WEIGHT

1430 kg
maserati_mistral_spyder_3_7

Mistral Spyder 3.7

1964 / 1970

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM109

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.7 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

245 ch
6.4 s
255 km/h
Already available in the coupe and Sebring, the 3.7 model became a slightly less attractive choice after 1966 when the new 4-litre version was launched. However, more than half the Mistral Spyders assembled were fitted with the 3.7-litre engine. An automatic gearbox was available for both the 3.7- and 4.0-litre versions.

CONSUMPTION

11.8 L/100kms

LENGTH

4500 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1675 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

WEIGHT

1430 kg
maserati_serbing_3700_GTI

Sebring 3700 GTI

1965 / 1968

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM101

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

3.7 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

245 ch
6.7 s
240 km/h
The Sebring Series II is not long in coming. The 3.7-litre engine first used in the Mistral is now available in the Sebring, alongside the 4-litre version. Power increased from 235 to 245 bhp. Stylistically, changes included a redesigned front end with chromed dual headlamp plate housing, a new bonnet and the side slots were now but located higher up on the front wings. Spoked wheels were still available on request. 245 second series Sebrings were assembled.

CONSUMPTION

11.8 L/100kms

LENGTH

4470 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1665 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

350 L

WEIGHT

1520 kg
maserati_mistral_4_0

Mistral 4.0

1966 / 1970

Vehicle type

Motor type

Gearbox type

Sports car
AM109

Motor

Displacement

Arrangement

4.0 L
front

Power

0-100

Max speed

265 ch
6.2 s
255 km/h
Presented at the Geneva Motor Show, it was to become the latest evolution in the dynasty of in-line 6-cylinder engines that had begun with the 3500 GT and earlier with the A6 series, or even with the pre-war 6CM Grand Prix car. The record speed was 255 km/h, no doubt helped by the car’s light weight and aerodynamic bodywork. Chrome-rimmed side vents adorn the car’s front wings. Towards the end of production, alloy wheels with the same design as those on the Ghibli were available on request. One of the 828 coupés assembled throughout production was reserved for Sir Peter Ustinov.

CONSUMPTION

11.9 L/100kms

LENGTH

4500 cm

TRANSMISSION

rear-wheel drive

WIDTH

1675 cm

RESERVOIR

70 L

HEIGHT

1300 cm

BOOT VOLUME

WEIGHT

1430 kg